Jump to content

Anyone here not really into 70's hard rock at all?


Guest Dangerous Toy
 Share

  

32 members have voted

You do not have permission to vote in this poll, or see the poll results. Please sign in or register to vote in this poll.

Recommended Posts

Guest Dangerous Toy

I have nothing but respect for the hard rock pioneers of the 70's. Alice Cooper, Scorpions, Kiss, Aerosmith, UFO, Ted Nugent, early Whitesnake and their like deserve their reputations as rock gods no doubt and I've tried and tried again to listen to albums from that era from top to bottom, but I find myself just enjoying the hits.

 

Maybe it's the production, lack of hooks or songs that don't really sound all that heavy to me because I'm used to each band's 80's output. I don't know, but I can tell you that I have tried and that's no joke. It's funny because I honestly haven't heard an 80's hard rock/hair metal album that I didn't like.

 

With the exception of AC/DC, Boston, and Meat Loaf's Bat Out Of Hell, everything else I own is from at least 1980. I've been told that had I grown up in the 70's, I would have a different respect for it's hard rock scene, but who knows. Am I just a freak of nature or is 70's rock just not for everybody?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For me, it would be: Absolutely! But not as much as 80's.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Voted for the middle one, although I don't like a lot of 70s stuff ... yet. For all of the bands listed in the original post, I prefer their later stuff, which says a lot really. I prefer the heavier stuff in the genres this site covers, which tends to be mid-eighties onwards. Having said that, I am huge Thin Lizzy fan, they were absolutely incredible, so can't rule out the 70s altogether! Plus I'm getting into bands like Heep even at this late stage.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have nothing but respect for the hard rock pioneers of the 70's. Alice Cooper, Scorpions, Kiss, Aerosmith, UFO, Ted Nugent, early Whitesnake and their like deserve their reputations as rock gods no doubt and I've tried and tried again to listen to albums from that era from top to bottom, but I find myself just enjoying the hits.

 

Maybe it's the production, lack of hooks or songs that don't really sound all that heavy to me because I'm used to each band's 80's output. I don't know, but I can tell you that I have tried and that's no joke. It's funny because I honestly haven't heard an 80's hard rock/hair metal album that I didn't like.

 

With the exception of AC/DC, Boston, and Meat Loaf's Bat Out Of Hell, everything else I own is from at least 1980. I've been told that had I grown up in the 70's, I would have a different respect for it's hard rock scene, but who knows. Am I just a freak of nature or is 70's rock just not for everybody?

 

 

Did you grow up in the 70's? Were you a teenager in the 70's? Ive always thought that a persons likes and dislikes of certain genre or music/songs depends some on if they were at the right listening age during those times. I went thru High School in the 70's so it was the music that brought real Rock N Roll into my life. I listened to it daily and not just the hits. So hearing complete "albums" all the time helped too Im sure.

 

Even though I do love it all I just dont listen to it as much anymore. There is today such a huge selection of bands and artists that staying only in the 70's means I miss out on too much great music. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Easy pick for me but I don't like it just as much as the 80's, I like it more !!!

This was when the "Real" Bad Company kicked ass with Alice Cooper, Rainbow, Zep, Sabbath, Aerosmith, Purple and list just goes on and on.

To me, music of the 70's had alot more substance to it unlike the music of today {not all of it} which I compare to the like of eating McDonalds......It satisfiy's your hunger for a short period of time before you need to go and get something else to eat because the satisfaction is very short lived.

That's my opinion anyway.......Love the 70's and gone back to listening to alot more of it :tumbsup:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Love the 70's hard rock as much as i love the 80's.The 70's has a special place in my heart as that's when i discovered Kiss,Alice Cooper,Black Sabbath,Deep Purple,Taste,AC/DC,Cheap Trick,Led Zeppelin and Thin Lizzy just to name a few.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Dangerous Toy

So I'm not alone. That's good to know.

 

Anyway, the last two 70's hard rock albums I picked up for cheap on Amazon were Trouble and Love Hunter by Whitesnake. Both are solid albums with a good 3 or 4 tracks each that I think easily stand toe-to-toe with anything released on Slide It In and their later albums, but again I found myself losing interest halfway through each disc and coming back to finish them later.

 

I never do that with hair metal/melodic hard rock albums. It's usually just the opposite as I can't wait to sit down, skim through the booklet and give a listen. I'll tell you what hurts the most though and that's not being able to fully get into 70's era Kiss.

 

All along I always thought Kiss would be the one 70's hard rock act I would enjoy more than the others, but I was wrong. After that I kind of realized I should just stick with what I dig the most and grew up listening to and that's hair metal and catchy hard rock.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Went with choice 3... I wouldn't exactly say I love it as much as the 80's stuff. There were many great 70's bands that released a lot of quality stuff. I would say the 70's was the last decade where the album as a whole was important. In the 80's the record companies just wanted a hit song on the release. The whole release wasn't as important as a single song that might get tons of airplay. That is why I think there are so many more releases that were good from start to finish from the 70's.

 

In today's world (00) there is even less of a reason to produce an album with great songs throughout. So much music is downloaded now that I'm not even sure bands expect to sell the whole release. Its a whole different market now.

 

Does any of that make sense? :popcorn:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Went with choice 3... I wouldn't exactly say I love it as much as the 80's stuff. There were many great 70's bands that released a lot of quality stuff. I would say the 70's was the last decade where the album as a whole was important. In the 80's the record companies just wanted a hit song on the release. The whole release wasn't as important as a single song that might get tons of airplay. That is why I think there are so many more releases that were good from start to finish from the 70's.

 

In today's world (00) there is even less of a reason to produce an album with great songs throughout. So much music is downloaded now that I'm not even sure bands expect to sell the whole release. Its a whole different market now.

 

Does any of that make sense? :popcorn:

 

That is actually very well said and to the point :tumbsup:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest artofmetal
:headbanger: Without the 70's, the excellence of the late eighties wouldn't have been spawned. Even though I don't listen to a whole lot of 70's rock(I do a little) I have a massive appreciation and respect! :headbanger:
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Did you grow up in the 70's? Were you a teenager in the 70's? Ive always thought that a persons likes and dislikes of certain genre or music/songs depends some on if they were at the right listening age during those times. I went thru High School in the 70's so it was the music that brought real Rock N Roll into my life. I listened to it daily and not just the hits. So hearing complete "albums" all the time helped too Im sure.

 

Even though I do love it all I just dont listen to it as much anymore. There is today such a huge selection of bands and artists that staying only in the 70's means I miss out on too much great music. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Absolutely love some of the 70's stuff, especially the mid/late part of the decade. Too many good bands to mention here that I still listen to on a regular basis and have done for nearly 30 years, which to be honest, is alot more than can be said than some of the bands these days.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Dangerous Toy

:headbanger: Without the 70's, the excellence of the late eighties wouldn't have been spawned. Even though I don't listen to a whole lot of 70's rock(I do a little) I have a massive appreciation and respect! :headbanger:

 

That's exactly how I feel bro. If I'm not listening to 80's hard rock/metal then it's classic rock all the way. I can't begin to list the amount of tunes I love from the 70's. I have the utmost respect for the acts that paved the way for the heavier 80's rock scene. It's the songs beyond the hits that I have trouble getting into. Again, I think it all comes back to 70's hard rock not sounding as heavy as 80's hard rock to me. That's just my opinion.

 

 

Did you grow up in the 70's? Were you a teenager in the 70's? Ive always thought that a persons likes and dislikes of certain genre or music/songs depends some on if they were at the right listening age during those times. I went thru High School in the 70's so it was the music that brought real Rock N Roll into my life. I listened to it daily and not just the hits. So hearing complete "albums" all the time helped too Im sure.

 

Even though I do love it all I just dont listen to it as much anymore. There is today such a huge selection of bands and artists that staying only in the 70's means I miss out on too much great music. ;)

 

I was born in the early 80's and latched onto melodic hard rock/hair metal just as grunge was getting it's footing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was also born in the early 80s, so kinda missed out on all the 70s music, although I started appreciating and going back to listen to all the bands that influence the bands I like. Like Dangerous Toy said, maybe my ears weren't used to the production quality of the music released that decade and that put me off. With so much music to go through I've been pretty much sticking to hits, but slowly getting into full albums. I think another reason why I don't really prefer full albums is that bands would throw them out every year! Just look at Heart, Queen, Aerosmith, Thin Lizzy, etc. Trying to produce so much music in a short amount of time is bound to introduce quite a bit of filler.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since I was born in '69 I got alot of exposure to '70's rock especially KISS. But I really didn't start appreciating it till the late 90's, early 2000's when there wasn't alot of quality music (IMO) coming out. I started to REALLY listen to great bands like RUSH, LED ZEPPELIN, BLACK SABBATH, BOSTON, QUEEN, PINK FLOYD, HEART, THIN LIZZY, UFO, SIR LORD BALTIMORE, BLUE CHEER, SKYNYRD, ALICE COOPER & early WHITESNAKE, SCORPIONS & PRIEST...You always have to respect the forefathers... :bowdown:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Dangerous Toy

I think another reason why I don't really prefer full albums is that bands would throw them out every year! Just look at Heart, Queen, Aerosmith, Thin Lizzy, etc. Trying to produce so much music in a short amount of time is bound to introduce quite a bit of filler.

 

Good point. A good amount of bands in the 70's released a new full length album every year and sometimes twice a year which I agree produced quite a bit more filler. That was also the case for some 80's hard rock acts as well, but they did seem a little bit more spaced out IMO. The five year gap between Pyromania and Hysteria is a prime example of this.

 

You always have to respect the forefathers... :bowdown:

 

Absolutely! :beerbang:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since I was born in '69 I got alot of exposure to '70's rock especially KISS. But I really didn't start appreciating it till the late 90's, early 2000's when there wasn't alot of quality music (IMO) coming out. I started to REALLY listen to great bands like RUSH, LED ZEPPELIN, BLACK SABBATH, BOSTON, QUEEN, PINK FLOYD, HEART, THIN LIZZY, UFO, SIR LORD BALTIMORE, BLUE CHEER, SKYNYRD, ALICE COOPER & early WHITESNAKE, SCORPIONS & PRIEST...You always have to respect the forefathers... :bowdown:

 

I would humbly like to add NAZARETH & BAD COMPANY to my list.... :whistle:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Haha. I was the first to vote for the first option. Whilst it's not 100% accurate it is by far the closest option for me. I can think of maybe 5 songs from the 70's I can tolerate, and that's on a good day. Generally I just hate all that I've heard from those years.

 

Would never be one to dispute that without it there would be none of the 80's bands I enjoy, but that doesn't mean anything to me. Without video cameras there would be no porn for me to view. That doesn't mean I need to like or enjoy video cameras. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Would never be one to dispute that without it there would be none of the 80's bands I enjoy, but that doesn't mean anything to me. Without video cameras there would be no porn for me to view. That doesn't mean I need to like or enjoy video cameras. ;)

 

it is like saying "if there were no Elvis there would have never been the Beatles, then without the Beatles there would have never been a KISS (Gene has been on film stating that the Beatles were the reason he wanted to be in music, he wanted to make a heavy metal Beatles) Then without Zepp there would have never been........... Without the slave owners having slaves and bringing the Blues to the south and influenced Elvis in his youth we never would have had Heavy Metal. Someone would have come along and changed something. sounds like a good episode for SLIDERS (you all remember that tv show, right) for them to "slide" to a universe where Elvis never became a singer and stayed a truck driver.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • 2021 HH Donation Drive

    Please support Heavy Harmonies! The donations goal is the out-of-pocket expenses to run the main site and this board for calendar year 2021.



    78% of donation goal reached.
    Donate Sidebar by DevFuse
  • Posts

    • From Escape Music: Bite The Bullet were originally formed in 1986 by singer songwriter Mick Benton and drummer Graham Cowling. They met in 1984 when they both joined West London rock band “Mother’s Ruin”. Thanks to the legendary Greg Lake, Benton managed to secure a solo deal with Atlantic Records and he asked Cowling to play drums. Its good to see that their collaboration is still strong to this very day. In 1986 “Bite the Bullet” were formed and the music played was in the style of Foreigner, Toto and Mr. Mister, an album was released in 1989 to some quiet success. The music was warmly received and the band earned themselves some radio airplay. However, britpop was coming into the forefront and a cancelled support slot with the mighty ELO saw the band disheartened and whilst they never really disbanded there was a long period of inactivity. Benton and Cowling always remained friends and they still played in pubs and clubs over the years which brings is up to 2019 when their debut was reissued on CD. It ignited a flame in the two men and brought the original recording back to the forefront again and old fans reappraised the album whilst new fans joined in. In January 2021 the year started with “Black and White” (ESM349) and the band have gone from strength to strength. They combine Mr Mister with Asia to produce a nice smooth rock pop sound. Mick and Graham Have continued writing new material and here we are with an exciting new third release “End of the Line” and the result is amazing; the new songs have given the band a new fresh sound, bringing us into 2022. What a way to start the new year!   Release Date: 21 Jan, 2022  Catalogue no: ESM361  1 Quicksand 4:20  2 Over You 4:26  3 End of the line 3:49  4 Cold Wind 3:45 5 Roundabout 4:20  6 Lost for Words 4:12  7 September Sun 4:03  8 Band of Brothers 4:35  9 Let it Go 3:56  10 Camaraderie 5:02  11 Base Jumping 4:11  12 Sunflowers and Roses 4:08 Line up Mick Benton – Lead Vocals, Guitar, Bass, Keyboards Graham Cowling – Drums Malcolm Jones – Guitar  
    • New song 'Fearless'.    
    • Feel The Steel - Steel Panther
    • In My Darkest Hour - Megadeth
    • Yeah sounding not too bad at all.
    • Yeah, I'll wanna hear the songs in full before I pass judgement, but this could be good. 
    • That's a good point I hadn't thought of. Of course the hospitals are going to treat whoever comes in because it's the right thing to do.  Hospitals don't turn away people that make stupid choices.  I guess what I was saying above was really that it's just hypocritical for somebody who is unvaccinated, gets COVID and then heads to the hospital for treatment.  You didn't trust science and medicine enough to take the vaccine but now you want medicine and science to save you?   Insurance is probably a whole different issue and yes, that's out of control in addition to the whole medical billing system.  Those are issues for another thread
    • Cool tunes, particularly the first 'One.' Nice. I'll check this out. 
    • I'll add it to tomorrow's playlist and allow the hilarity to infiltrate me. 
    • not worked up. I couldn't give a stuff about VH the band or EVH. Was never really a fan tbh outside of a handful of songs. But MM is a twat. Period. 
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.