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AOR and Hard Rock

The groups, the albums, who's hot, who's not. Discuss.


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    • Vandenberg - Sin Chicago - The Chicago Story (2 CD) Megadeth - So Far, So Good, So What? (Expanded) The Allman Betts Band - Down to the River Mike Oldfield - Five Miles Out (Remaster) Buckingham & McVie - S/T Michael Hutchence - S/T Roxy Music - Stranded (Remaster) Echo & the Bunnymen - Reverberation  Echo & the Bunnymen - Evergreen (Expanded)
    • After releasing two albums with AOR/Melodic Rock band Streets, ”1st” (1983) and ”Crimes In Mind” (1985), lead singer and keyboardist Steve Walsh returned to Kansas, to revive the band along with original members Phil Ehart (drums) and Rich Williams (Guitar). Furthermore, the lineup was completed by the addition of bassist Billy Greer (from Streets) and young, promising, former Dixie Dregs guitar man Steve Morse, who also contributed with composing skills and backing vocals. Eventually, the group’s ”Power” album was released in November of 1986, rather much to the vintage Kansas and Prog Rock purists dismissal, as I recall it. The heavier sound/direction and absence of violinist Robby Steinhardt, songwriter/keyboardist/guitarist Kerry Livgren and bassist Dave Hope were all contributing factors to the disapproval, it seems. However, mentioned ”Power” should perhaps instead be judged on its own merits, as it is what it is. Put out in a time when commercial Melodic Hardrock was very much in fashion, with FM rock radio and MTV as ever the important ingredients of daily life. In the end, the album actually landed at a respectable No. 35 on the Billboard chart, while the single/ballad ”All I Wanted” eventually rose to an even more impressive No. 19. Review by Thomas McFapperson 2024.        
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