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JORN - Life On Death Road


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BREAKING NEWS: Frontiers Music Srl is delighted to announce the release of JORN's brand new studio album, entitled “Life on Death Road” on June 2, 2017. Pre-order from the Frontiers' webstore here: www.frontiers.shop

Easily one of the greatest rock singers of the 21st century, Norway's very own giant Viking warrior Jorn Lande’s vocals are resoundingly strong once again on his ninth original studio album, “Life on Death Road”! This absolutely brilliant new album sees Lande attacking the microphone with rejuvenated vigor, accompanied by a new band and a bigger and stronger sound.

“Life On Death Road” took several months of hard work for the songwriting vision to come together. JORN needed to take the music to a new level to push the concept of the band further than it has ever gone before. The result is a record that is deep, strong, full of groove and powerful with anthemic songs aplenty! Songs like "Man Of The 80's", "Love Is The Remedy", "Life On Death Road", "Insoluble Maze (Dreams In The Blindness)", and "The Slippery Slope (Hangman's Rope)" capture the essence of Jorn as a singer, songwriter and lyricist.

Jorn says, "It's easily one of the best albums I've ever recorded. This was all about putting the right people together for the right result, and about taking the necessary time to work more thoroughly and in depth with the material we chose for the album. The older I get, the more I feel it is necessary to listen to my heart and look for that genuine and honest feeling that made me take interest in music in the first place. Back in the 70's and early 80's when I grew up, people and music were more free and so the presence of feeling and soul came more naturally and was expected from an artist or a band. This is the energy and craftmanship we've been looking for, but still keeping a pulse on the modern times we live in. "Life On Death Road" is an original album that is pretty much summing up the last 40-50 years of rock and metal and has become a hybrid modern heavy rock album without losing those tasty elements of a good aged wine. Regardless, we're all products of our time, and the feeling, soul and symbioses we've achieved for this album is a rarity in today's music world, so in that sense this album is a true old school sailors' "tall ship adventure". From start to finish it took us nearly three years to finalize and I'm really proud to say that this album is the proof that classic albums can still be made."

The album also marks the debut of a new lineup of very experienced and gifted musicians around the Norwegian singer. On bass is Mat Sinner (Primal Fear, Sinner, kiskesomerville) who needs virtually no introduction to European heavy metal fanatics. On keyboards and production is Alessandro Del Vecchio (Hardline, Revolution Saints), who already joined JORN for the recording of his last covers album, “Heavy Rock Radio” and was the glue that helped Jorn to create the feel and the direction for the new album. Francesco Jovino (Primal Fear) is on drums and Alex Beyrodt (Primal Fear, VOODOO CIRCLE) handles guitar. Truly a recipe for a roaring success!

Jorn had no desire to do "just another" JORN record. The aim was to do the best record possible and it took almost two years of writing, arranging, and producing before wrapping this all up. The performances are thunderous across the board and you can hear the urgency of these songs in Jorn's singing!

Jorn's catalogue is getting too long to include in brief overviews and his innovative and creative skills as a vocalist and music visionary have led to him selling millions of albums worldwide while being a frequent entrant on sales charts around the world including Billboard. Worth a mention here though are his years fronting Masterplan, whom he recorded three albums with. He has also recently collaborated with the world's biggest online gaming company, Riot Games, providing vocals for the virtual band "Pentakill" in the game "League of Legends". Claimed to be the biggest selling Norwegian musical export since the pop band A-Ha, Jorn continues his rock crusade and there are no signs of him slowing down and “Life on Death Road” is a magnificent testament to his abilities!

“Life on Death Road” tracklisting:

1. Life On Death Road
2. Hammered To The Cross (The Business)
3. Love Is The Remedy
4. Dreamwalker
5. Fire To The Sun
6. Insoluble Maze (Dreams In The Blindness)
7. I Walked Away
8. The Slippery Slope (Hangman's Rope)
9. Devil You Can Drive
10. The Optimist
11. Man Of The 80's
12. Blackbirds

JORN

Jorn Lande – Vocals
Alex Beyrodt - Guitars
Mat Sinner – Bass
Alessandro Del Vecchio - Keyboards
Francesco Jovino – Drums

Produced by Alessandro Del Vecchio and Jorn Lande

www.jornlande.com


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Mmm i'll wait for the first sample but i'll be amazed if this isnt the same plodding euro nonsense.

 

One lives in hope we might hear another Millenium but i doubt it.

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  • My Little Pony

I'm always interested in new music from Jorn. Yeah, he's consistently inconsistent, but I love his voice.

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I thought Trond Holter was gonna play on this one.

No matter, Alex Beyrodt is great as well.

I'm with KarpetRyd, always look forward to new Jorn material. Looking at the line-up, it's got the vibe of perhaps being a Jorn fronted "Primal Fear" album.

I hope so.

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I can conjure up not an ounce of excitement for this, but I am still interested as the music is always good. It's just the replay value is below zero. :(

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Jorn has such a great voice. Worldchanger and Out to Every Nation were good records, but he seems to have plateaued a bit since then. I'm still waiting for him to put out a solo album that really blows me away.

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I have to close my eyes when watching the clips.

He has this way of being too over the top with his enthusiasm for what he's singing.

Sounded ok to me. I only hope for a couple of stand out songs and I'll be happy. Most of it I'm sure I'll find a bit repetitive and kind of the same.

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Just what i would expect from Jorn.

I love it, what can i say, i'm a fan.

 

Would like to hear (and see) a Jorn/Meta Loaf collaboration.

Brothers from a different country

BTW, speaking of Meatloaf, Does any body else sometimes hear similarities between him and Blackie Lawless? Particularly in "Forever Free".
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Will someone give that man a mic!!! Seriously. Put it in his hands now! Make the awkwardness stop. Why do all the other band members have their instrument, except Jorn? It's just silly.

 

As for the song, hmmmm, not sure. It's not awful, but I don't exactly like it. Sounds like the average side of current Jaded Heart (or Sinner, funnily enough). Holy shit, though, pretty awesome solo!

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More to point Del Vecchio looks ridiculous. I know he can't help being 3.5 ft tall but couldn't they raise him up a bit :lol:

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More to point Del Vecchio looks ridiculous. I know he can't help being 3.5 ft tall but couldn't they raise him up a bit :lol:

 

Haha, I didn't even see him there. Yeah, he's small.

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Will someone give that man a mic!!! Seriously. Put it in his hands now! Make the awkwardness stop. Why do all the other band members have their instrument, except Jorn? It's just silly.

 

As for the song, hmmmm, not sure. It's not awful, but I don't exactly like it. Sounds like the average side of current Jaded Heart (or Sinner, funnily enough). Holy shit, though, pretty awesome solo!

 

Yeah, I'm with you there.

Hate bands without mic's.

Jorn is worse because he looks like a tool. Would much prefer him singing into a mic in the studio, or even better, a clip without him in it.

Musically a great track, but the vocals define it. Not bad, but just Jorn i guess.

Probably grow on me.

In fact I'm listening as I type and I like the song more already :)

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I actually like it. Not amazing, by any means, but it's still cool.

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