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What type of CD collector are you?


What type of CD collector are you?  

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5 hours ago, lettard said:

I just can't do that,I love the look and feel of the physical disc/booklet etc in my hands,must be just me

It's not just you. I still don't get it, this craze for digital music. People have been sold an inferior product and one that has also destroyed the livlihood of the majority in tge industry they love. A cd provides income to an artist, gives you a physical copy with artwork etc., you can make digital copies of it yourself, the music is heard as the artist intended in a long format album.

Instead people are choosing to get digital files that they don't own (read the fine print), or rent songs on Spotify that rip off artists and provide them with next to zero income for their art. 

IMO it's a travesty that music fans have been sold this lie about how "amazing" digital music is or how wonderful these curated playlists on Spotify are. Its also funny how they sneer at those who "still buy cds" like we are somehow Luddites or something absurd. The truth is otherwise.

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Every cd I get I listen to a minimum twice before putting it on my selves (alphabetical). I have thousands so yes, some go years without a play. But I go through stages. Right now I am listening to a

I buy on cd all the time. Why would I buy digital when cd is a hard copy of digital anyway? And vinyl is pitched at hipsters who want the cool factor, but the sound is inferior, the medium is fragile

I buy fleetingly anymore at best and I rarely bought/buy new releases. It was the rifling through racks and racks and racks at some Podunk pawn shop that did it for me. Always on the hunt for that 1 c

I used to buy every cd under the sun of something that interested me, but now I'm down to my top 25 artists.  These are basically the artists that I hope continue to make new albums.

There's another 50 or so that I like and will listen to and enjoy; but I'm not gonna be crestfallen if they never release another album.  Probably another 100 or so after that I have a passing interest in listening to.

It's shaping up to be a stupendous year release wise for me, as 8 of my to top 10 are slated to have albums out this year. 

1.  Avantasia

2.  Edguy

3.  Epica

4. The Night Flight Orchestra

5. Threshold

6. Kamelot 

7. Battle Beast
8. Beast In Black

9.  Lordi

10. Blind Guardian

11. Harem Scarem

12. Elvenking

13. Soilwork

14. The Agonist
15. Halestorm
16. Shinedown
17. Amaranthe
18. Volbeat
19. Eclipse
20. The Pretty Reckless
21. Hell In The Club
22. W.e.t.
23. Symphony X
24. Masters Of Ceremony

25. Seven Spires

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14 hours ago, auslander said:

It's not just you. I still don't get it, this craze for digital music. People have been sold an inferior product and one that has also destroyed the livlihood of the majority in tge industry they love. A cd provides income to an artist, gives you a physical copy with artwork etc., you can make digital copies of it yourself, the music is heard as the artist intended in a long format album.

Instead people are choosing to get digital files that they don't own (read the fine print), or rent songs on Spotify that rip off artists and provide them with next to zero income for their art. 

IMO it's a travesty that music fans have been sold this lie about how "amazing" digital music is or how wonderful these curated playlists on Spotify are. Its also funny how they sneer at those who "still buy cds" like we are somehow Luddites or something absurd. The truth is otherwise.

In reality though, isn't the absolute best thing you can do for an artist is to buy the physical CD AND stream it?  I mean, once you buy that CD, the artist gets absolutely nothing from every listen of that CD or from digital files you've ripped and listen to on a USB stick.  You could listen to it a million times and the artist is getting zilch from you other than some fraction of the $10-$15 you spent for the CD.  And often times people buy a used CD on Ebay or whatever.  In that case the artist never gets a penny from you.  On the flip side though, they do get something (even if small) from streams of their album.  And I assume those stream counts are also used for other things like measuring an artists popularity and who knows what else.

Hey, I was right there with you a couple years ago.  I despised streaming and bought CD's for every release that I wanted that came out.  However, what really turned me was getting a new car without a CD player as my car is where almost all my listening happens.  I quickly grew tired of using wonky USB drives to listen to stuff in the car so decided to give Spotify a try.  I fell in love with the convenience of it and basically having my whole library at my fingertips all the time for basically the cost of 1 CD a month.  And yeah, I did also find I like being able to organize different playlists.  

Then I took a look at all my CD's sitting on my shelf and wondered what I should do with them.  I pictured the day when I'm no longer here and my kids or somebody else having to deal with them.  And I know what would happen....They'd probably all just get dumped in the trash or sold at a garage sale for .50 cents each or something.  I figured I'm just better off selling many off now and getting closer to what I know they are worth then having them get dumped in the trash.   I've pulled in a nice little sum that past year or so.

I will still buy some CD's for my favorite artists to support them but I also can say I haven't actually listened to a CD in about a year now.  They ones I have bought I've pulled out the booklet to read along lyrics while streaming or to rip digital files but haven't actually listened to the CD's.

I'm not one that will ever criticize anybody for how they choose to listen to music though.  The important thing is just listening however you can and supporting artists by buying what you can, spreading the word, going to shows and getting people around you to open their minds and ears.

 

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I'm still buying CD's ,anywhere from 7 -15 new releases and many used releases.

Sadly the days of going to stores and looking at CD's is over so most new purchases are from Amazon. 

I must have somewhere between 100-200 CD's that I haven't listened to yet.But I'll get to them eventually !!

I just need  more damn time !

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50 minutes ago, tts42572 said:

In reality though, isn't the absolute best thing you can do for an artist is to buy the physical CD AND stream it?  I mean, once you buy that CD, the artist gets absolutely nothing from every listen of that CD or from digital files you've ripped and listen to on a USB stick.  You could listen to it a million times and the artist is getting zilch from you other than some fraction of the $10-$15 you spent for the CD.  And often times people buy a used CD on Ebay or whatever.  In that case the artist never gets a penny from you.  On the flip side though, they do get something (even if small) from streams of their album.  And I assume those stream counts are also used for other things like measuring an artists popularity and who knows what else.

Hey, I was right there with you a couple years ago.  I despised streaming and bought CD's for every release that I wanted that came out.  However, what really turned me was getting a new car without a CD player as my car is where almost all my listening happens.  I quickly grew tired of using wonky USB drives to listen to stuff in the car so decided to give Spotify a try.  I fell in love with the convenience of it and basically having my whole library at my fingertips all the time for basically the cost of 1 CD a month.  And yeah, I did also find I like being able to organize different playlists.  

Then I took a look at all my CD's sitting on my shelf and wondered what I should do with them.  I pictured the day when I'm no longer here and my kids or somebody else having to deal with them.  And I know what would happen....They'd probably all just get dumped in the trash or sold at a garage sale for .50 cents each or something.  I figured I'm just better off selling many off now and getting closer to what I know they are worth then having them get dumped in the trash.   I've pulled in a nice little sum that past year or so.

I will still buy some CD's for my favorite artists to support them but I also can say I haven't actually listened to a CD in about a year now.  They ones I have bought I've pulled out the booklet to read along lyrics while streaming or to rip digital files but haven't actually listened to the CD's.

I'm not one that will ever criticize anybody for how they choose to listen to music though.  The important thing is just listening however you can and supporting artists by buying what you can, spreading the word, going to shows and getting people around you to open their minds and ears.

 

Yep, all very similar to me. 

All I did for about a decade was buy every CD I could find and never thought I'd be into anything else. Now, everytime I walk in the garage I see this ridiculous amount of CDs that I haven't touched in years. I slowly go through them in my car, which is the only place there is a CD player now, but that is an excruciatingly slow process, whereas I'm going through tonnes of songs a day digitally, via my phone. 

Unfortunately, I have a shed full of videos, magazines and trading cards that I have to get through before I even look at selling my CDs. The plan is to sell it all, but getting the time to do it is near impossible. Sold a bunch of videos and magazines, but not even a 1/4 of the way through them, with the cards and CDs to follow. I dread to think what I'll get for them as I've left it so long, and I won't sell them for nothing... so who knows, by default I probably end up keeping them?

But like others have said, the convenience of listening to MP3 over CDs is infinite. 

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There was a time when I was a record/cassette collector, then I became a CD collector, now I consider myself a music collector, I guess. 

I'm with Glen regarding the convenience of digital music. Having said that, I'm not interested in Spotify, itunes, etc. I still need to "own" my music. 

There was a time when I absolutely had to have the CD for the reasons stated above. Artwork, liner notes, etc, but I'm over that now.

As for the thrill of discovering CDs in the old days, I find that I still get that thrill when discovering new/old stuff.

The only difference now is that I can instantly hear it and obtain it.

Then theres the whole storage and fear of damage factor. I hope you have a backup of all your CDs, or at least a hard copy list.

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I still buy cds but digitised most of my collection 10-15 years ago purely for the convenience.

I like to physically own my things, same with video games. If I had money I would probably start a vinyl collection but it's just not going to happen.

Digital music is here to stay. For me personally it's a throwaway file that has, it's going to sound weird, no real connection to the artist.

I use digital music for its convenience and to sample music, then buy the cd if I like it. Some bands and albums I'll deliberately not listen and just order it.. there's nothing quite like the excitement of hearing a new album untainted except maybe the debut single.

I also find you can get into just brushing aside new digital music because you haven't invested in it. It was the same during Napster, Kazaar etc. It was awesome coz you could finally get a chance to listen to something you couldn't previously get a hold off but listening to 5-10 new albums a day quickly became tiresome.

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